Khader

Al- Khader (St. George)

Contributed by Turathuna Bethlehem University on 06.12.2006:

A short distance out of Beit Jala is the village of al-Khader, a little town of 5,000 inhabitants. It is surrounded by vineyards, fig and olive trees. It can be reached via Beit Jala or the Bethlehem-Hebron Road. The entrance to the village is marked by a distinctive stone gate. Inside the village, there is the Greek Orthodox monastery of St. George, a popular site of pilgrimage where the sic(...)

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Feast of St. George May 5, 2000; Arab Educational Institute/Artas Folklore Center Discover Palestine Trip

Contributed by Leyla Zuaiter on 14.05.2006:

St. George, also known as "Al Khader" or "the Green One," which is also the name of the village in which his church is located, has a very prominent place in Palestinian tradition. What is extremely interesting is that he is associated with the Jewish Elija,/Elias, the Christian Saint George, and the Muslim "Al Khider," who was a kind of Sufi guide to Musa, or Moses in the Koran. Many of the(...)

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Photo Essay: Feast of St. George 2006 El Khader

Contributed by Leyla Zuaiter on 13.05.2006:


It was six years ago that I had gone to the Feast of St. George, or El Khader. On that occasion I was accompanied by a large group of Palestinian Students exploring their religious and cultural heritage in a series of unforgettable trips under the auspices of the Arab Educational Institute and the Artas Folk(...)

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Photo Essay on Feast of St. George 2006 (1) Entering the Lane in Front of St. George’s Monastery

Contributed by Leyla Zuaiter on 13.05.2006:


Entering the free-standing gate of El-Khader on the Hebron road across from Solomon's Pools, one drives quite a way before reaching the older part of town around the Church of El Khader. The street, lined with vendors selling traditional snacks and toys, is crowded with men, women and children. Original Con(...)

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Photo Essay on Feast of St. George 2006 (2)Cotton Candy at the Feast of St. George, El Khader

Contributed by Leyla Zuaiter on 13.05.2006:


What could more immediately put one in a festive mood than the sight of a child with holding a towering mass of pink cotton candy, or "girls' hair" as it is whimsically called in Arabic? Original Content Creator: Leyla Zuaiter

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Photo Essay on the Feast of St. George 2006 (3)Cart of Traditional Sweets at Feast of St George

Contributed by Leyla Zuaiter on 13.05.2006:


This cart holding slabs of traditional sweets was one of the first of the many treats to the tastebuds as well as to the eyes on the way to the Church of St. George on his feast day. Original Content Creator: Leyla Zuaiter

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Photo Essay on Feast of St. George 2006 (4)Funny Hat

Contributed by Leyla Zuaiter on 13.05.2006:


This young man has found an eye-catching way to advertise his wares and to add to the festive atmosphere in the little lane outside the Monastery of St. George in the Village of El Khader. Original Content Creator: Leyla Zuaiter

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Photo Essay on Feast of St. George, 2006 (5)Peanut Vendor in Front of Monastery

Contributed by Leyla Zuaiter on 13.05.2006:


At the Feast of St. George, this curious peanut roaster tugs at the memories of Palestine of the past. Original Content Creator: Leyla Zuaiter

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Photo Essay on the Feast of St. George (6)Cart of Termos

Contributed by Leyla Zuaiter on 12.05.2006:


A young man stops for a treat of termos, a tasty snack of yellow pulses,in the street outside the church of St. George in El Khader on his feast day. Original Content Creator: Leyla Zuaiter

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Photo Essay on the Feast of St. George, 2006 (7)Street Scene

Contributed by Leyla Zuaiter on 12.05.2006:


The crowds are thick at the entrance to the monastery, as those entering squeeze past those leaving. Unseen here are the young boy scouts passing out cards bearing the image of St. George on horseback, offering a transition from the festivities of the street to the more solemn air within the church. Origina(...)

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