Jericho

Jericho: Oasis Town

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 18.02.2007:

By Delia Khano

Jericho is a sleepy agricultural town, which is actually an oasis in the great rift that runs from Galilee through the Dead Sea, Eilat, and Aqaba and down into Africa; it is known here as the Jordan Valley. Being below sea level, it is several degrees warmer than the hill country and is considered a winter resort by families from East Jerusalem, Ramallah, Bethlehem, and (...)

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Warming Up in Jericho

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 11.02.2007:

By Dr. Ali Qleibo

In winter, Jerusalem projects a sense of forlorn melancholy. The early September clouds increase the level of humidity. The dry, vibrant summer ochre and rose hues bouncing off the stones of the city lose their brilliancy. An iridescent thin mist of honey gives Jerusalem its unique autumn glow. As the sun sets farther and farther south, the city plunges from bright su(...)

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When Horses Fly: the Jericho Equestrian Club

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 20.10.2006:

by Leyla Zuaiter



On May 7 and 8, fifty people headed to the Jericho Equestrian Club for a day and a night of equestrian sports, games and a barbeque under the desert moon. The club is the centrepiece of the Yasser Arafat Martyr Complex for Sport and Culture. This oas(...)

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The Jericho Wildlife Monitoring Station

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 14.05.2006:

by: Palestine Wildlife Society

Palestine is considered one of the most important places for monitoring bird migration in the world. This is due to its geographical location on the western boundaries of the Asian continent directly on the south-eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea and on the eastern boundaries of Africa. This geographical location places Palestine at the juncture of t(...)

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Headless Camel in Jericho

Contributed by James Prineas on 03.05.2006:


This amazing specimen was captured on film a kilometre or two west of Jericho. Original Content Creator: James Prineas

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Entrance to St. Gerasimus Monastery, or Deir Hogla near Jericho

Contributed by Leyla Zuaiter on 26.02.2006:


This monastery in the desert just outside Jericho is a good example of how many religious, social, historical, cultural and touristic and recreational aspects revolve around religious monuments in Palestine-and of course, lots of stories to go with them. See the other entries on St. Gerasimus Monastery to ge(...)

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Wax dolls under Painting of Madonna and Infant, St. Gerasimus Monastery or Deir Hogla, near Jericho

Contributed by Leyla Zuaiter on 26.02.2006:


Seen here is a ledge below the painting of the Madonna nursing the infant, where there are a few framed photos of children, for whom the Madonna’s intercession is sought for cures. If you look hard you will be able to make out some rather eerie wax dolls or body parts. These represent the ailing parts of the(...)

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Woman preparing Herbs in Courtyard of St. Gerasimus or Deir Hogla, near Jericho

Contributed by Leyla Zuaiter on 26.02.2006:


"In the courtyard, a table was set up in the middle arch with an enormous aluminium vat on the left. An elderly woman with short grey hair was seated in front of the table preparing herbs. Large piles of watercress, parsley and other herbs awaited her attention. As we left, I learned of some of the touristic(...)

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Cures cast in Wax, St. Gerasimus Monastery or Deir Hogla near Jericho

Contributed by Leyla Zuaiter on 26.02.2006:


The church on the second floor at the St. Gerasimus convent holds some unusual sights, as recorded in my journal entry for March 22, 2005. "Now we climbed the staircase in the courtyard to a church above the chapel. It too was richly ornamented and full of paintings. Harry Potter has nothing on St. Gerasimu(...)

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The Courtyard of St. Gerasimus or Deir Hogla near Jericho (3)

Contributed by Leyla Zuaiter on 26.02.2006:


There were so many things competing for my attention in the courtyard of St. Gerasimus. Should I take photos or notes? Should I study the architecture, the paintings, the stalls, the people or the plants? Such was my quandry on my trip to the monastery. About a third of the way into the courtyard was a kind(...)

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