Haifa

Haifa

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 25.01.2009:

By Mariam Shahin with photographs by George Azar

For the first 40 years of the 20th century, Haifa was the most sophisticated city in Palestine. As the de facto capital of the north, it was home to the country’s main port, the most important rail system, and a 1,200-mile-long oil pipeline that connected Palestine to Iraq.

Its population was cosmopolitan and its urban landscape w(...)

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The Hijaz-Palestine Railway and the Development of Haifa

Contributed by Toine Van Teeffelen on 24.11.2007:

Johnny Mansour

From:

Jerusalem Quarterly

Fall 2006

Issue 28

Connecting the holy sites in the Hijaz to Istanbul via railway was a project that came to light during the reign of the Ottoman Sultan Abdel Hamid II. He sought to demonstrate his strength and power practically by applying the concept of a greater Islamic community to a series of projects within the(...)

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Bahai Temple and Gardens in Haifa

Contributed by Turathuna Bethlehem University on 18.10.2006:


Bahai Temple in Haifa is the spiritual center for the world's 5 million adherents of the Bahai faith.

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Bahai Temple

Contributed by Turathuna Bethlehem University on 18.10.2006:


A view of the Bahai Temple in Haifa. It serves as the spiritual center for the world's 5 million adherents of the Bahai faith. Said Ali Muhammad, one of the two founders of the Bahai religion, is buried inside the modest interior of the shrine. The Bahai Gardens, planted in 1909, are the best kept in (...)

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Bahai Temple and Gardens in Haifa

Contributed by Turathuna Bethlehem University on 18.10.2006:

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The beautiful golden-domed shrine is located on Mount Carmel, and serves as the spiritual center for the world's 5 million adherents of the Bahai faith. Said Ali Muhammad, one of the two founders of the Bahai religion, is buried inside the modest interior of the shrine. The Bahai Gardens, planted in 1909, are the best kept in the entire country.

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Saraya, the Ogre’s Daughter (Emile Habibi)

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 06.09.2006:

SARAYA, THE OGRE’S DAUGHTER

By Emile Habiby

By Emile Habiby

Translated from the Arabic by Peter Theroux

Ibis Editions, Jerusalem, 2006, 210 pages, $16.95

One moonless night in the summer of 1983, on a boulder off the shore of what once was al-Zeeb, a Palestinian village north of Acre, the narrator of Emile Habiby’s haunting last novel catches a glimpse of a (...)

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History Repeats Itself

Contributed by Terra Sancta School For Girls on 11.03.2006:

Manar Atick

I made an interview with Nasri Ghattas, my uncle’s cousin. Nasri was born in 1936. He started talking about how life was in the past before 1948.

“At that time all the people were in a similar situation. They were sometimes poor, not so much financially but rather because their life was simple. There was no electricity and people took water from the well. Despite all(...)

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