Community Histories

Sheikh Hassan al-Labadi: Seven Acts of Lost Memory

Contributed by Toine Van Teeffelen on 16.11.2007:

Nazmi al-Jubeh

From: Jerusalem Quarterly

Institute of Jerusalem Studies

Spring 2007

http://www.jerusalemquarterly.org/details.php?cat=4&id=235

Some may think (and have every right to do so) that this tragic play of seven acts is a figment of the writer’s imagination. But the narrator did not intervene in any way in the composition of its actual events, a(...)

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Ramallah: Past and Present

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 30.08.2007:

By Issa Jamil Shihadeh

Ramallah, built on 19,000 dunums of land and located 16 kilometres north of Jerusalem, was known as “Ramalie” in 1186, when the king-consort of Jerusalem, Guy de Lusignan, offered this little village in trust to the German hospital in return for a one-year loan.

The name Ramallah is composed of “ram,” an Aramaic word that means “hill” and “Allah,” the Arab(...)

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The Town of ‘Ezariyeh

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 30.07.2007:

By Saleh Abu Damous

The present-day town of ‘Ezariyeh is the ancient village of Bethany that dates to the sixth century BC. It is also the biblical village that Jesus chose as a refuge from the crowded city of Jerusalem. He often went there to visit his friends - Lazarus and his two sisters, Martha and Mary, Simon the leper, who warmly welcomed Jesus, and others.

In many ways, ‘(...)

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The Samaritans of Palestine

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 30.07.2007:

By Tareq al Qudsi

Today, when we think of the Samaritans, our minds return to the biblical period and the story of the Good Samaritan (Gospel of Luke, chapter 10) or even of the Samaritan woman who gave Jesus a drink from a well located in Nablus (Gospel of John, chapter 4). But in fact, not only do the Samaritans play a significant role in the past history of Palestine, their culture (...)

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The African Palestinian Community in the Old City of Jerusalem

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 30.07.2007:

By Dzouyi Therese Konanga-Nicolas

When we think of Africans and Islam, it always brings to mind the famous Bilal Ibn Rabah, the first Muezzin or caller to prayer in Mecca. Bilal was an Abyssinian slave who was mistreated by his master for accepting Islam. To rectify this inequity, Abu Bakr Al Sidiq, successor of the prophet and the first Caliph, helped to free him from his oppressors. (...)

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The Circassians of Palestine

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 30.07.2007:

By Adeeb Asfoura

On a recent visit to Abu Ghosh, I met a guy from a large family who showed me around the village. When I looked at his deep blue eyes, I knew something was a little different about this man even though he spoke perfect Palestinian Arabic.

After sitting down in a restaurant, we started to talk about Abu Ghosh, and he told me something that was new to me: “We’re f(...)

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The Moroccan Community in Palestine

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 30.07.2007:

By Noura al-Tijani

Their roots were in the Mediterranean and Atlantic coasts, but the hills of the Old City of Jerusalem became their new home. Since the 12th century, the Moroccan community flocked to Palestine, seeking the blessings of the Holy Land and desirous to gratify their inquisitive minds and yearning souls with its spiritual and almost mystical ambiance. Their trip was a hol(...)

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The Palestinian Bedouins

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 30.07.2007:

By Arturo Avendaño

During an interview in a goat-hair tent some ten years ago, Sheikh Mohammed Iskheiman Hassan Ka’abneh Milihat Abu Iskheiman, of the Ka’abneh tribe, started to explain the meaning of being Bedouin. The interview was part of a research project initiated by the Italian NGO, C.I.S.P. At that time, a close relationship was formed between C.I.S.P and Sheikh Abu Iskheiman a(...)

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The Armenian Community in the Holy Land

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 30.07.2007:

By Tania Manougian

The Armenian presence in the Holy Land predates the life of Jesus Christ, when Armenia and Palestine were part of a common empire. The Armenian Great King Tigran 11 (95 to 55 BC) conquered the northern part and extended his influence over Palestine. Ever since Armenia became the first nation to adopt Christianity as its official state religion (301 AD), the Armenians(...)

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The Ansari Family of the Indian Hospice

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 30.07.2007:

By Nourjahan Ansari

For nearly seven centuries, the Indian Hospice in Jerusalem has served as a unique and historic destination for Indian pilgrims to the Holy Land. The saga of this Hospice began in the days of the Ottoman Empire when the legendary Sufi saint, Baba Farid of Shakar Ganj, travelled to the Holy Land as a pilgrim. Out of respect for his saintly qualities, the governor all(...)

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