Community Histories

The Vagabond Café and Jerusalem’s Prince of Idleness

Contributed by Jerusalem Quarterly on 03.06.2008:

Salim Tamari

Jerusalem Quarterly

October 2003

Issue 19

The return of Khalil Sakakini from his American sojourn in the autumn of 1908 was an occasion for contemplating the creation of a new kind of cultural space: the literary café; a public meeting place to accommodate his newly-formed circle of literati, the "Party of the Vagabonds" (hizb al-sa'aleek). For Sakakin(...)

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Cave dwellers south of Hebron

Contributed by Arab Educational Institute on 19.05.2008:

Israeli Policy Leaves Palestinians Homeless in the South Hebron Hills of the Occupied Territories

From:

Ahmad Jaradat, Alternative Information Center (AIC)

Source:

AIC website

22 April 2008

http://www.alternativenews.org/news/_english/_israeli-policy-leaves-palestinians-homeless-in-the-south-hebron-hills-of-the-occupied-territories-20080422.html

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Sixty years ago in Battir

Contributed by Arab Educational Institute on 07.05.2008:

Reprinted from The Electronic Intifada website:

http://electronicintifada.net/v2/article9513.shtml

Sixty years ago in Battir, my small hillside village near Jerusalem, I witnessed the chaotic collapse of the British Mandate administration in Palestine and the beginning of the Nakba.

The previous months had been decisive ones for the fate of Palestine, although we did not (...)

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Beginning of the Nakba in Baq’a (Jerusalem)

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 04.05.2008:

The Moshe Dayan Carpet and the Beginning of the Nakba in Baq’aBy David Halaby

I was only six months old when this story happened, but I learned about it a generation later. I was moving house in Berkeley, California, and my father was helping in the effort. As I carried a small - by then almost antique - carpet into our new house, my father saw it and said, “Oh, so you ended up with th(...)

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The Nakba: Alonia, Ein Karem, and Deir Yassin Palestinian Cultural Diversity and Ethnocide

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 04.05.2008:

By Dr. Ali Qleibo

The spiritual nature of Palestinian geography strikes deep roots in all the peoples who have settled the country throughout the past five millennia. The land itself exudes a prescient sense of the holy. Intimations of the Other, the elusive mystical feeling of a transcendent presence through whose grace the miracle of life continues, is inextricably related to the lan(...)

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History of Al Walajeh (near Jerusalem)

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 04.05.2008:

Al-Wallajeh (Jerusalem) - A Story of Multiple Displacement

On 21 October 1948, nearly all the homes of Wallajeh, located in the district of Jerusalem, were demolished by the Israeli army. Most of the residents were forced to flee to refugee camps in the West Bank and Jordan, where they number 12,500 today. More than two-thirds of the village lands were annexed to Israel, inaccessible t(...)

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A Century and a Half of Women’s Encounters in Artas

Contributed by Artas Folklore Center on 23.04.2008:

On March 8, 2007 the Artas Women's Group hosted members of Palestinian and foreign women's' groups in their village. If at first, this village doesn't seem like the most obvious venue for such an encounter, you might change your mind after reading about some of the other women who visited, lived, worked or studied in Artas.

#1. Clorinda Minor When the world didn't end in 1844 as predic(...)

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Encounter in Surif Palestinian Peasant Household Solidarity

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 30.11.2007:

By Dr. Ali Qleibo

The summer has come to an end; the guava season is over, and the olives are harvested. As the sunset shifts farther and farther south, the shadows grow longer and the daylight grows shorter ... By four o’clock it is dark. Green oranges, tangerines, and pomelos fill the market. Winter is well on the way.

Um Naser of Beit Ummar was overjoyed to see Aida and me re(...)

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Two Hours Are Enough in Gaza

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 30.11.2007:

By Sami Abdel Shafi

Having stepped into my fifth year in Gaza, I now realize that nothing remains the same in this place. This is where the ordinarily wonderful experience of watching the rising and setting of the sun turns into a sense of eeriness as besieged Gaza seems such a dead place. A journalist friend described his entry to Gaza through the Beit Hanoun (Erez) crossing point, in(...)

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The Hijaz-Palestine Railway and the Development of Haifa

Contributed by Toine Van Teeffelen on 24.11.2007:

Johnny Mansour

From:

Jerusalem Quarterly

Fall 2006

Issue 28

Connecting the holy sites in the Hijaz to Istanbul via railway was a project that came to light during the reign of the Ottoman Sultan Abdel Hamid II. He sought to demonstrate his strength and power practically by applying the concept of a greater Islamic community to a series of projects within the(...)

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