Community Histories

The Gypsy Community in Jerusalem

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 25.05.2006:

The origins of the Gypsy people in Palestine can be traced back to India in the 18th century. The Gypsies of India originally referred to themselves by the term “Dom,” meaning “man” in their language. While in other Gypsy communities the word was transformed into “Rom” or “Lom,” the word “Dom” is still used by the Gypsies of the Middle East and North Africa. Other names used to designate Gyp(...)

View Contribution

The Civil Disobedience of Beit Sahour

Contributed by Arab Educational Institute on 17.03.2006:

Beit Sahour, on the way from Bethlehem to Herodion, is a Palestinian town of 13,000 with a Christian majority and a Moslem minority. It engaged in a different kind of Intifadah. It took up the flag of nonviolent civil disobedience against the Israeli occupation.

Civil disobedience in Beit Sahour began with the idea of "home economy." Well-off families adopted a regime of self-imposed a(...)

View Contribution

The tax revolt in Beit Sahour

Contributed by Arab Educational Institute on 17.03.2006:

During the Intifadah the inhabitants of Beit Sahour refused to pay taxes to the occupation authorities. They were not prepared to pay the occupier as long as they did not receive services. "No taxation without representation" was their slogan. Some of them were even put into prison. In many cases the army entered the homes to take away the belongings of those who refused to pay. One woman saw(...)

View Contribution

On A Donkey: A Syriac history

Contributed by Terra Sancta School For Girls on 11.03.2006:

Tamara Kando

I interviewed my grandmother whose name is Salma Kando. She told me about the difficult life that they used to live. She told me the story of how she and her brother came to Palestine.

“I was born in 1915, so I am 84 years old. I came from Halab [Aleppo] in Syria together with my father and brother after we ran away because of the Turkish occupation. The Turkish gov(...)

View Contribution

I Can’t Forget My Hometown (Ein Karem)

Contributed by Terra Sancta School For Girls on 11.03.2006:

Claude Tushieh

Homeland is dear to all of us. I often asked myself questions about my roots. My father used to say that the essence of the present problem is the injustice done to our people in 1948 when over 700,000 people were forced to leave their towns and villages. Encouraged by this and in order to know the facts about the nakba [disaster] in 1948 and its negative repercussions o(...)

View Contribution

I Was Born In War. I Have Lived In War. And I Feel That I Will Die In War.

Contributed by Terra Sancta School For Girls on 11.03.2006:

Amal Owaineh

My grandfather is a great man. He is an educator but not like a teacher at school; he got his education through the school of his life. He was born in 1926 during the British period; afterwards he lived the Jordanian and now the Israeli period. I like spending my spare time chatting with him. He tells me wonderful stories full of history and lessons of life. With the help (...)

View Contribution
 1 2 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11