Culture

Embroidery

Contributed by Spirit Of Sumud Tourism Program on 31.08.2009:

http://www.spiritofsumud.ps/gal-10.shtml

an interview with Ms. Melvina Awwad about Embroidery. These interviews were conducted as part of the Spirit of Sumud- Cultural tourism program.

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Aida Kattan (1): The taboun

Contributed by Spirit Of Sumud Tourism Program on 28.08.2009:

Aida Kattan is a teacher from Beit Jala.

The taboun is the Palestinian oven.

How to warm or lighten up the taboun for preparing the bread?

The taboun, which is outside the house, is made from mud. Inside are small stones, called radif. The oven is made round from inside. You close the taboun from above like a pan. You have to close it with a cover. Then you put on top of (...)

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Aida Kattan (2): The Palestinian Mukhtar

Contributed by Spirit Of Sumud Tourism Program on 28.08.2009:

Aida Kattan is a teacher from Beit Jala.

In the past the whole hara used to have a mukhtar [head of a neighborhood or village]. The mukhtar did everything what was necessary for the administration, as when there was a khotbeh, or a marriage, or when somebody died. When there was a quarrel about the land, people went to the mukhtar, and also when there were papers which had to be stampe(...)

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Aida Kattan (3): the Palestinian wedding in the Bethlehem area

Contributed by Spirit Of Sumud Tourism Program on 28.08.2009:

Aida Kattan is a teacher from Beit Jala

I want to speak about the customs and traditions here in this region when somebody gets engaged or married, especially among Christians.

Tulbeh [asking the hand] and its preparation

It is not possible that the young man just goes to the bride or her parents for asking her hand. It is necessary that first the ladies of the man’s fami(...)

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Aida Kattan (4): Henna brought on the bride

Contributed by Spirit Of Sumud Tourism Program on 28.08.2009:

Aida Kattan is a teacher from Beit Jala

Before the henna was put on the bride, the bride and the groom and their family and friends went to the hammaam, the Turkish bath.

I remember the hammaam Sitt [lady] Miriam in Jerusalem. It is long ago that the hammaam Sitt Miriam existed. Now it does not exist anymore. The men, alone, and the women, alone, came every day. On Saturday, the(...)

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Aida Kattan (5): Nuzha, the summer picnic

Contributed by Spirit Of Sumud Tourism Program on 28.08.2009:

Aida Kattan is teacher from Beit Jala.

Fifty, sixty years ago, inhabitants of Bethlehem, Beit Jala and Beit Sahour, and also from Jerusalem, came over and visited the countryside here for a long picnic. Then the majority of the townspeople went out. Everybody in Beit Jala went for instance to the Maghrour [the countryside west of Beit Jala] or Sharafeh [further in the direction of Jeru(...)

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Aida Kattan (6) Traditions from the home courtyard

Contributed by Spirit Of Sumud Tourism Program on 28.08.2009:

Aida Kattan is a teacher from Beit Jala.

IN THE COURTYARD

Let me tell you about life in the courtyard of the Palestinian house as it still was when I was young, during the 1950s and 60s.

When the women finished their work inside the house - the cooking, the preparation for the lunch and the wash - they came and sat together in the courtyard in front of the house. When the(...)

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Jabra Ibrahim Jabra: memories of Christmas

Contributed by Arab Educational Institute on 25.08.2009:

The Shoes

Adapted from: Jabra Ibrahim Jabra, The First Well, A Bethlehem Boyhood, The University of Arkansas Press 55-60.

During Christmas we received presents at the Monastery. Father Domaggi told us how happy he was with our presence at the monastery and our regular attendance at church. Father Odeh told us that Jesus was exactly like us. He was poor, and he was destitute. Wh(...)

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The Palestinian love affair with Turkey

Contributed by This Week In Palestine on 30.07.2009:

Turkish Delights

By Dr. Ali Qleibo

“She gave birth to a baby girl!” Aida screamed overjoyed relating the happy news as I climbed up the staircase to the house.

“Who gave birth?” None of our relations, friends, or acquaintances, as far I knew, was pregnant.

“Maram, of course. And Husam is much nicer to her now.”

It took me a few minutes to realise that my 13-(...)

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Syrian Foods

Contributed by Pearl Solomon on 20.07.2009:

I learned to cook Syrian foods from my Inlaws! Since they are deceased,I have been unable to get some of the recipes that they made.

This site that I found,is just about the same as the foods that I do make.So I would like to be able to get recipes that I missed in my years married to their son.

Thank you,

Pearl Solomon

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