Food & Recipes

Rishtaye

Contributed by Mona Wafa on 02.04.2008:

Rishtaye

(Also known as Smat, Msalwaa, or Mjammadeh)

The many different names for this dish suggest that it probably has many different ethnic sources. In the Palestinian society however, and mainly within the Christian community, this dish is linked to what is called "Nidr', meaning when you want something to happen you ask for it in your prayers. If it comes true, the housewif(...)

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Mafghoussa (or mashed)

Contributed by Mona Wafa on 02.04.2008:

This recipe is from the southern areas of Palestine. It is ideal for a barbecue but can be done on any other occasion.

Ingredients:

3 red tomatoes

2 Zucchini

1 Onion

1 hot green pepper

3 garlic cloves

Olive oil

Salt to taste

Preparation:

Cut the Zucchini, hot green pepper, and onion into two pieces each. Place all the veget(...)

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Maqloubeh (Upside-down)eggplant casserole

Contributed by Mona Wafa on 02.04.2008:

Maqloubet Batinjan (Upside-Down Eggplant Casserole)

Ingredients:

2 large eggplants

Salt to sprinkle on raw eggplants

1 ½cups long grain rice (preferably Basmati)

Vegetable oil for deep frying

2 large onions,diced

1 kg lean stew beef cut into medium pieces

1 large recipe tomato,thicly sliced

1 ½tbsp salt

½tsp.ground black pe(...)

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Siami

Contributed by Sufian Mustafa on 29.03.2008:

Siami is the adjective derived from the verb “to fast”. It describes the Syrian vegetable-eating habit, which is a continuation of Christian fasting traditions that forbid the consumption of animal products during certain periods.

More than ninety percent of the Palestinian diet is made up of vegetables: stuffed, rolled or sautéed. Stuffing vegetables is a Palestinian art. It includes (...)

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Tomatoes in Palestinian cookery

Contributed by Sufian Mustafa on 29.03.2008:

Tomato is originally from Peru and was first imported to Spain in the 16th century, but the Syrian Arabs new it from the Italian, hence the name Bandourah, from the Italian Pomodoro. It was the Sicilians who exploited tomatoes as a sauce to blend with pasta having learned to puree it from the Arabs. Until the 18th century tomato was believed to be poisonous, since people with money had plates(...)

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Palestinian flavour

Contributed by Sufian Mustafa on 29.03.2008:

Even though food flavour is unified throughout Pal¬es¬tine, the Palestinian cuisine can be divided roughly into four re¬gions, according to the variations in taste: the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, the Galilee and the area known as the Tri¬an¬gle. Variations are evident in the intensity of the taste of food and not in the reci¬pes themselves.

The difference between what Palestinians cook(...)

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Too Cold without One

Contributed by Sufian Mustafa on 29.03.2008:

Winter in Palestine could be quite cold in the evenings that one has to have lots of hot drinks to keep warm. Traditionally, families used to huddle around a stove that provided the only source of heating on long winter nights. Stoves were fuelled by coal or wood and, more recently, kerosene and gas. With alcohol not being a customary drink in Palestine, hot beverages were called for to warm (...)

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Too hot without one

Contributed by Sufian Mustafa on 29.03.2008:

The Palestinian summer is too hot during the day that one has to keep drinking to make up for the lost body liquids, if exposed to direct sun. The Palestinians, as well as the rest of Asia, have, over the centuries, developed the art of making drinks. The fact that sugar was known to Asia for a long time helped a great deal since sugar is an essential ingredient of most drinks.

A few t(...)

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Fakiha

Contributed by Sufian Mustafa on 29.03.2008:

Thammer is Arabic for fruit, which is defined as the part of the plant that develops from the ovary of the flower and contains the seeds. This definition covers vegetables and nuts. Fakiha, however, is Arabic for delicious and joyful fruits, i.e. those fruits which are sweet and juicy and therefore, are fun to eat. Fakiha is derived from the verb to be happy, the same root for Fukaha, Arabic (...)

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kitchen revival “Arabic”

Contributed by Sufian Mustafa on 28.03.2008:

من الأصالة إلى الإغتراب

مطابخ العرب، مطابخ عريقة متوغلة في القدم

ودلالات ذلك تكمن في تراكيب الطعوم وألاطعمه وتصنيفاتها، وفي ادوات المطبخ التاريخية، وفي التنوع المحير في المواد الخام وفي طرائق اعدادها، وفي غناء طعومها وذلك لاتساع قواعد الطعم فيها ولوفرة محاصيلها النباتية، كما تكمن في لغة المطعم ومصطلحاته اللغوية. لكنها تعيش انحسارا شديدا، فهي الان تقليدية للغاية فلا تعديل ولا ابت(...)

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