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Handicrafts & Artifacts

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Showing 21 - 40 from 65 entries

> The Palestinian Scarf ... Fashion Statement or Symbol?
> Designing Palestinian Handicrafts
> Palestinian Design in the Context of Furniture...
> Armenian Pottery and the Karakashians
> Blue rough cotton woman's shirt with pointed sleeves.
> The Emergence of Trade in the City of Hebron
> Magic and Talismans
> Palestinian handicrafts
> Bethlehem handicrafts
> Traditional Palestinian dress
> The Storage Jar (Al-Khabiya)
> Tashakeel: A haven of handmade jewellery
> The Stone Tradition in Palestine
> Fashion under Adversity
> Taybeh Beer
> Embroidery and Beyond Cultural heritage provides a...
> Mother of Pearl A Traditional Palestinian Craft
> Palestinian invents queuing socks
> Nablous soap
> Tattoos
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Blue rough cotton woman's shirt with pointed sleeves.
   
submitted by S. Suleiman
30.06.2008

Plate 36. The sleeves of this shirt are cut out of one piece, and not put together, as is the case with the shirt shown on the previous plate. The seams are often decorated with multicoloured silk stitches. The native women of Jerusalem used to wear garments cut in a similar fashion, but of huge dimensions. They were gathered in the ancient Persian manner, and the upper sleeve-edges were tied together behind the neck. This produced a very picturesque fold arrangement.

W. Gentz Coll.

From Oriental Costumes Their Design and Colours by Max Tilke 1922

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